5 Tips To Improve How You’re Training Employees With Video

A Quick Guide To Training Video Success

March 20, 2017/0/0
training video, training employees with video

Are you in a workplace that’s training employees with video? Do you think that the quality can improve but you’re not a video production expert and don’t know how exactly? Perfect. You’re in the right place.

Training Employees With Video

Once upon a time training videos had gained a bad reputation for being very long, often poorly produced and for showcasing acting worse than reality TV stars. And this is because too many were.

We, like everyone, want poor training videos to be a thing of the past. This is why we want to empower you with these 5 tips so you know a few basic things about how to improve the production of a training video. Maybe even next time you’re given a feedback form, you’ll feel fully ammo-ed enough to bomb people with questions and suggestions.

After all, a good video can be the difference between training that’s successful, and training that’s a bit of a waste of time.

Don’t Drop The Production Quality


In the words of Richard Branson, “If You Look After Your Staff, They’ll Look After Your Customers. It’s That Simple.”, which really sums up where we are coming from with this.

Training employees with video isn’t cheap. Many people think because an internal training video won’t be seen by customers, there’s an opportunity to cut some corners on production and save a little money. Well, although you can save some money, you need to beware of the other outcomes.

The reality is, you could still suffer some costly consequences if you decide to do make a cheap internal training video. You need to show that you value your staff’s time just as much as you value your customers. Poorly produced training video’s are difficult for even the most attentive staff to keep focus on, and if your consumer facing content is high quality, you could leave your staff feeling undervalued compared to what you’re giving your customers.

Break Up Long Content Into Short Training Videos


Whatever industry you’re in, when it comes to fully training employees with video, it’s not going to be a five-minute watch. Training videos are naturally long because there’s just so much content to cram into them, there’s not a lot you can do about that.

However, what you can do is make it easier for your audience’s brains to keep focus by finding ways to break up the content.

  • Plan interaction points.

Plan into your productions ideal places to open discussion about what’s gone on. Pausing to let the learning switch from online to offline dramatically helps to keep your audience engaged. Attention is far easier to maintain when your mind does short bursts of different tasks rather than slugging out one thing for ages. This is why switching from the screen, to discussion, back to screen and so on, stops your audience from falling asleep half way through an hour training video.

  • Chapter your content

Who is the best person to know what part of a training video you probably need a bit more time to learn, rewatch, or skim over…since nothing’s changed from last year. Yourself.

Make it easy for your workers to take better control of their learning by letting them hop in and out of a long video to the bits they want. We’re moving on from the days of DVD scene selection; staff prefer to have access to training videos online. Video hosting platform Wistia makes it dead easy to split content into chapters, right within its platform.

Track Your Analytics To Improve


Knowing where to start improving your training videos is quite difficult. Do yourself a favour and give yourself some solid data to work from.

If 70% of your employees are dropping out halfway through the video, or if 50 people rewinded back to 3 minutes in to rewatch that section, you have an idea where you should start targeting your efforts for making improvements.

Choose a video hosting platform that lets you track in-depth analytics, so you can see stats on your video engagement just like the examples above. It will really help you to understand your employees behaviour without you even having to directly ask them.

If you want to improve your next video, start by looking at your current one.

Get The Best On Camera


You can’t be training employees with video and not taking the casting seriously. It just doesn’t work. Are you going to hire actors or cast employees?

The best solution is to hire actors. Simply by hiring a professional actor you’re going to improve the quality of your training video…they wouldn’t have much of a living if it wasn’t true.

But, if you choose not to use actors, give the employees you’re casting a heads up that they’re going to be filmed. It seems so obvious (almost doesn’t seem worth mentioning) except we’ve seen clients only brief employee’s they’re being cast in a training video… on the very morning of the shoot. No time to prepare at all.

To someone who’s not been on camera before this becomes a pretty nervy task. It makes work much easier for both the director and the talent when they’ve been given time to read through the script.

Don’t Make Entertainment Priority No.1


The No#1 priority for training employees with video isn’t entertainment. Training videos can be long enough already without being stretched out further with cheesy comedy.

Scripts that over do the entertainment element tend to have the last laugh when they’ve completely lost their employees attention. if your employees are having to work too hard to spot the core messages, you could lose their attention and your video becomes useless.

You need to strike a balance between being too humdrum and being too far off focus. Stick to getting the most important things across clearly and add a little personality when appropriate.

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George M.

George is the marketing executive here at Lumira Studio. He enjoys all aspects of content marketing and won’t consider his job done until everyone is educated on the power of video. Also, he’s a bit of a music geek and likes to get the Led out when he can.

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